5 Active Sight Word Games to Play This Summer

There are so many games available for mobile devices right now in different niches. As a parent you want your child to be engaged in learning skills but small children might not love straightforward learning. This is where fun learning with gaming was introduced and it’s a successful niche.

As you know sight word games are a perfect opportunity for kids to bring their reading skills. Some of these outdoor activities for kids contain content such as word recognition and extension, but the rest are designed to really enjoy getting outside together. You’ll need some orange cones to set simple limits for a couple of these games.

  1. Hopscotch:

Hopscotch for a difference! On your pavement, make an old-fashioned hopscotch board and write sight words on every square. Any time your child hops on a square, have her read the sight word. Have you forgotten how to play?

This can be a simple kid-playing game.

  1. Scrabble game:

Scrabble word finder is a board and tile device in which two to four players try to shape words on a 225-square board using lettered tiles; the words spelling out by the characters on the tiles interlock like words in a crossword puzzle. At the start of the game, players draw seven tiles from a pool, which they replenish after each turn. The tiles in the pool, as well as those of other players, are kept covered so that a player can only see his own tiles and those on the floor. Some or more of a player’s tiles can be traded for those in the pool if he or she forfeits his turn.

  1. Water painting:

Too plain and yet so much fun. A flat floor, water, and a paintbrush are what you’ll need. Paint words with water on a dark background or on the cement with your kids. Another version of the water painting activity is to have your child “paint” over a phrase you specify.

I painted a board with chalkboard paint and bought a mini “touch-up” paintbrush. The Home Depot sells all of these products. As you mention the words, write them in chalk and make your child colour on them.

  1. Flashlight Fun:

This is a tremendously exciting operation! You’ll use sticky notes to write sight words on and then tape them to the wall. They can be organized in a group or distributed around your house. Have your child say a word and then flash the spotlight on it.

  1. Magnifying Words:

Cute magnifying glasses are also sold in both major retail and specialty stores. In Michael’s Craft shop, I find this cute bug magnifying glass. Say a word and ask your child to look it up in the text. Books, journals, and magazines are also viable options.

Image Source: Freepik

Conclusion:

Going back to campus, though, I’m still a little concerned, hoping that not too many children have succumbed to the “summer slip.” Despite the fact that school is not in session, summer presents a multitude of resources for active and fun ability practice. I especially enjoy integrating physical activity into my classroom.